Highline Medical Center Lays Off 85 Employees


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On Tuesday, Burien’s Highline Medical Center laid off 85 management and staff positions.

CEO Mark Benedum said, “Today is an incredibly difficult and painful day for us. In order to assure our financial stability, we had to reduce 85 management and staff positions at both campuses through a lay-off. In many cases, these are individuals who have given years of service and significant contributions to our organization. This was not an easy decision and it was something I had hoped we would not have to do.”

Like most hospitals both locally and nationally, Highline Medical Center has been hit hard by the declining economy. Highline’s net revenue has been negatively impacted by both a decrease in outpatient volumes and an increase in uncompensated care. These factors led to significant financial losses in December and January and a projected loss in February.

Benedum continued, “We have taken actions to respond to the decline in the economy. While we initially believed that these measures would allow us to manage the economic fall-out, it was not enough. We cannot continue to spend more than we are earning. Continued losses of this magnitude are not an option. We have a responsibility to our patients and the community to reduce our costs and remain financially viable.”

The vast majority of positions that were eliminated were not involved in direct patient care.

Highline Medical Center first opened in 1958 as Burien General Hospital. It now includes two healthcare campuses and more than 20 clinics across Southwest King County. As the tenth-busiest emergency department in the Puget Sound region, Highline serves as the base station for the Burien area emergency medical unit. In 2008, Highline broke ground on a new ER & Patient Care unit, which is slated to open in early 2010.

More information is available at their website: www.highlinemedicalcenter.org.

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Comments

6 Responses to “Highline Medical Center Lays Off 85 Employees”
  1. Jimbo says:

    Did you get that photo from a stock photo service. Please.

  2. btownblog says:

    Is there a problem with using stock photos? Hmmm…I didn't get that memo…

  3. btownblog says:

    Ok, the model in that stock photo, like the victims of the economy, was laid off today…

  4. Lillie says:

    I am truly curious as to how they say that they did not layoff people in direct patient care! when most of the layoffs were LPN’s who were working at the bedside taking care of patients, I.V. team who started IV’s PICC lines(special IV’s ) who are at the bedside and taking care of patient’s IV needs. The Cardiac Rehab has been eliminated which is direct patient care for patient’s who were discharged and need help with diet, exercises etc. to help prevent rehospitilizations. The 24 hr nurse who took calls from patient’s that need help and assist wether or not to come into the hospital for help. These jobs are called “not direct patient care?” Iwant to address how they cannot afford to keep these positions open and have employees working them when they can afford to continue construction on a new ER because we have so many patient’s coming in to seek help, also they are bringing in 40-45 NURSES from the Philipines to come in and work in this building next year in 2010. But they cannot afford there employees to work jobs now? Will it be better in 2010? Will the population suddenly increase to require jobs to be started and filled? What do you think?

  5. Jon says:

    I am truly curious as to how they say that they did not layoff people in direct patient care! when most of the layoffs were LPN’s who were working at the bedside taking care of patients, I.V. team who started IV’s PICC lines(special IV’s ) who are at the bedside and taking care of patient’s IV needs. The Cardiac Rehab has been eliminated which is direct patient care for patient’s who were discharged and need help with diet, exercises etc. to help prevent rehospitilizations. The 24 hr nurse who took calls from patient’s that need help and assist wether or not to come into the hospital for help. These jobs are called “not direct patient care?” Iwant to address how they cannot afford to keep these positions open and have employees working them when they can afford to continue construction on a new ER because we have so many patient’s coming in to seek help, also they are bringing in 40-45 NURSES from the Philipines to come in and work in this building next year in 2010. But they cannot afford there employees to work jobs now? Will it be better in 2010? Will the population suddenly increase to require jobs to be started and filled? What do you think?

  6. Emily says:

    Buyer Beware for Highline Medical Center
    Highline Medical Center Complaint by EmilyHill

    You were reading a complaint about Highline Medical Center.

    If you are smart enough to read this site, BEFORE you check in to Highline Medical Center, you are smart enough NOT TO GO to Highline Medical Center. They are a ‘regional’ hospital with send-out service for most lab tests – a downtown Seattle hospital will have in-house labs [translation: my sister waited FOUR days for a diagnosis of appendicitis while writhing in pain at Highline Medical [appendicitis! easy, right?? NOT for Highline Medical Center;

    by the time the surgeon operated, her appendics had perforated and her recovery IN THE HOSPTIAL BED was one month! Highline Medical rates an 85% on national reviews for ability to diagnosis ailments [not good!most hospitals are getting 98%-100% ratings]. Buyer Beware!

    Solution?? Call 911 and zip up to ANY Seattle hospital for better care than this outfit

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