Wine And You’ll Feel Better At The Poverty Bay Wine Festival March 4-6


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Ric Jacobson

For all of you wine connoisseurs out there, you will recognize and appreciate the following quote by Robert Mondavi:

“Wine to me is passion. It’s family and friends. It’s warmth of heart and generosity of spirit. Wine is art. It’s culture.”

For Rotarian Ric Jacobson, owner of Corky Cellars in Des Moines, wine is also a lifetime passion. Ric brought to the Rotary Club of Des Moines the idea of a wine festival as a fund raiser, and we are pleased to say seven years later it has been a resounding success and is now a staple in the South King County area. We are also delighted to say that we have over 20 Washington wineries at this year’s festival. Each winery is well-known for the premiere quality of their wines and each bring their own personal story and tradition. One winery in particular has an amazing story that we would like to share with you.
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Otis Kenyon Winery is a family owned and managed winery with deep historical ties to the Walla Walla Valley. The story of Otis Kenyon Wine begins in the Walla Walla Valley in the early 1900s. A young man, James Otis Kenyon, was a struggling dentist practicing in Milton-Freewater, Oregon. When a new dentist moved to town, James, for reasons that remain a mystery, burned his competitor’s office to the ground. Ostracized by his wife and presumed dead by his two sons, the family moved to Walla Walla, Washington. Robert Otis Kenyon, the eldest son, never spoke of his father even to his son, Stephen Otis Kenyon. Yet, almost exactly 50 years after the incident that began the family legend, Steve discovered his grandfather living quietly on the Oregon coast.

James was reunited with his sons and became a joyful part of their families living long enough to witness the birth of his first great grandchild, Muriel. Although he passed on at age 101, James would have delighted in the birth and naming of his great grandson, Samuel Otis Kenyon.

Otis Kenyon label

Today, in tribute to four generations of Otis Kenyons each with strong ties to the Walla Walla Valley, owners Stephen Otis Kenyon and Deborah Dunbar have returned to the area to make wine. Guided by an unyielding commitment to excellence, they are passionate growers and producers of elegantly structured and affordable Bordeaux and Rhone varietal wines.

In honor of James Otis Kenyon, the label bears his silhouette.

You’ll be able to sample Otis Kenyon wines at the Poverty Bay Wine Festival, which will be at the Landmark on the Sound Event Center the wekend of March 4-6th. Plus, come meet us and our co-bloggers from our sister site The Waterland Blog, who will be there all weekend, “blogging live” and hanging out, exploring the many Masonic mysteries of the historic Landmark on the Sound building (we’ll even show you where a time capsule is buried) – so come say hi!

IMPORTANT NOTES:

  • Tickets are just $25.00 in advance, which includes 10 tasting tokens (tastings range from 1 – 3 tokens).
  • Additional tasting tokens available for $1.00.
  • Discounted Advance Ticket Sales end at Noon on Friday, March 4, 2011.
  • Tickets purchased at the event will cost $30.00.
  • Groups of 20 or more contact Ric Jacobson at 206-824-9462 for discount pricing.
  • Wine Festival tickets are good for a one-day admission on either Friday, Saturday or Sunday.
  • 21 and over ID Required at Door.
  • No Pets Please.
  • This is an indoor event with free parking and free shuttle service from the Des Moines Marina (limited parking available at site for $10.00 per day)

For more information about the Poverty Bay Wine Festival or to purchase tickets, please visit http://www.dmrotary.org/.

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Comments

One Response to “Wine And You’ll Feel Better At The Poverty Bay Wine Festival March 4-6”
  1. LW says:

    Don’t forget about Deborah Dunbar’s local connections, she grew up in Burien!

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