WEATHER: ‘Excessive Heat Warning’ Continues; Red Cross Offers Tips


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With temps predicted to be in the 90s today and tomorrow, the National Weather Service continues its “Excessive Heat Warning” through 11 p.m. Friday evening, Aug. 17.

“The combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a dangerous situation in which heat illnesses are likely,” reads the warning. “Pets and farm animals are also at risk.”

Here’s the full warning, updated at 3:55 a.m.:

…EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM NOON TODAY TO 11 PM PDT FRIDAY…

* TIMING…THE INTERIOR OF WESTERN WASHINGTON WILL HAVE HIGH TEMPERATURES WELL INTO THE 90S BOTH TODAY AND FRIDAY.

* TEMPERATURE…HIGH TEMPERATURES ARE FORECAST TO REACH THE LOW TO MID 90S BOTH DAYS IN THE SEATTLE AREA…WITH MID TO UPPER 90S POSSIBLE IN SOUTHERN AREAS. NIGHTTIME LOW TEMPERATURES WILL BE MAINLY IN THE 60S.

* IMPACTS…THURSDAY AND FRIDAY ARE LIKELY TO BE AMONG THE HOTTEST DAYS OF THE YEAR.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

AN EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING MEANS THAT A PROLONGED PERIOD OF DANGEROUSLY HOT TEMPERATURES WILL OCCUR. THE COMBINATION OF HOT TEMPERATURES AND HIGH HUMIDITY WILL COMBINE TO CREATE A DANGEROUS SITUATION IN WHICH HEAT ILLNESSES ARE LIKELY. PETS AND FARM ANIMALS ARE ALSO AT RISK.

TAKE EXTRA PRECAUTION IF YOU WORK OR SPEND TIME OUTSIDE. WHEN POSSIBLE…RESCHEDULE STRENUOUS ACTIVITIES TO EARLY MORNING OR EVENING. KNOW THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT EXHAUSTION AND HEAT STROKE. WEAR LIGHT WEIGHT AND LOOSE FITTING CLOTHING WHEN POSSIBLE AND DRINK PLENTY OF WATER.

TO REDUCE RISK DURING OUTDOOR WORK…THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION RECOMMENDS SCHEDULING FREQUENT REST BREAKS IN SHADED OR AIR CONDITIONED ENVIRONMENTS. ANYONE OVERCOME BY HEAT SHOULD BE MOVED TO A COOL AND SHADED LOCATION. HEAT STROKE IS AN EMERGENCY. CALL 9 1 1.

The Red Cross is offering the following tips during this time:

With temperatures expected to rise today and tomorrow, the American Red Cross encourages individuals and families to take the necessary precautions. The very young and the elderly are especially vulnerable to the heat, so it is important that families and friends check on them regularly. People with chronic health issues are also at greater risk and need to take special care to stay healthy in the heat.

Prevent Heat-Related Illness:

  • Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing (light colors reflect away some of the sun’s energy) and plenty of sunscreen. Wear a hat or use an umbrella to help shield you from the sun.
  • Carry water or juice and drink frequently, even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid alcohol and caffeine, which dehydrate the body. Make sure to check on youth and elderly to make sure they have enough fluids.
  • Eat small meals and eat more often. Avoid foods that are high in protein, which increases metabolic heat.
  • Avoid strenuous activity. If you must do something physically demanding, try to do it during the coolest part of the day, which is usually between 4:00 and 7:00 a.m. Take regular breaks to cool off.
  • Stay indoors as much as possible.
  • Watch for signs of life-threatening heat stroke. The person’s temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly.
  • Signals of heat stroke include hot, red, and usually dry skin, changes in consciousness, rapid, weak pulse and rapid, shallow breathing. If you or someone you know experience symptoms, call 9-1-1 or your local EMS number.
    • Move the person to a cooler place.
    • Quickly cool the body by wrapping wet sheets around the body and fan it. If you have ice packs or cold packs, place them on each of the victim’s wrists and ankles, in the armpits and on the neck to cool the large blood vessels.
    • Watch for signals of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear.
    • Keep the person lying down.
  • Be vigilant about water safety if headed to a pool or beach. Never leave a child unattended near water and keep lifesaving gear handy.
  • Don’t forget to protect your pets. Make sure your pet has constant access to shade and an endless supply of cool, clean water, and never leave a pet in a car – even for a few minutes.

For more safety tips and information about first aid, aquatics and other Red Cross classes and products, please visit www.redcross.org.

The American Red Cross is a non-profit, humanitarian agency dedicated to helping make families and communities safer at home and around the world. For more information, visit www.redcross.org.

And as we posted Wednesday, here are some of our tips on keeping cool:

BURIEN TOWN SQUARE PARK SPRAY PARK!
Kids of all ages can get splashed for free at the Burien Town Square Spray Park Water Feature Thingy, located just outside the library and squirting all day.

BURIEN FARMERS MARKET!
Come get some refreshing fresh produce, berries and other treats – including nice cold Shave Ice – at the Burien Farmers Market near Town Square Park between 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. And…come find your very cool, very original bloggers in their nice cool tent! Then walk through the nearby Spray Park Water Feature Thingy!

SEAHURST PARK!
With lots of shady trees, and more importantly, still-cold Puget Sound water to cool down in, this is probably going to be ~10 degrees cooler than the rest of Burien. Highly recommended – just wear some good shoes as it’s likely the lower parking lot will be filled up early. Oh, and be sure to look (and listen) for the Ice Cream truck late in the afternoon!

SMOOTHIES FOR TEENS AT THE BURIEN LIRBARY!
Mmm…smmmoothies…Teens can cool off at the Burien Library Thursday by making smoothies from 3-4 p.m. Do you have a favorite smoothie book? http://trib.al/5OoOif

AIR CONDITIONED BURIEN LIBRARY!
Of course, the Burien Library is air conditioned, and there are a lot of worse things to do than spending a day reading for free or surfing the ‘net in a cool, big building with A/C.

BURIEN LITTLE THEATRE
Go see ‘Anna in the Tropics’ (read our review here) and use the Coupon to save $5! Support local theater and stay cool:

AIR CONDITIONED RESTAURANTS/BARS!
Most every major restaurant or bar in B-Town is air conditioned. Find your fave and enjoy a cool, refreshing beverage, knowing that not only are you keepin cool, but you’re also helping the local economy. We recommend sticking to the local indie places though, especially our friends and longtime Advertiser The Tin Room/Theater (the back deck will be open) at 923 SW 152nd Street, or 909 Coffee & Wine (also with a deck and patio) at 909 SW 152nd in Olde Burien, or Germaine’s at 127 SW 153rd Street. Oh, and did we mention the following Coupons?

CITY OF SEATAC COMMUNITY CENTER!
Burien will not be opening any kind of “cooling centers”; however, the City of SeaTac will be extending the hours of its air-conditioned Community Center/Senior Center at 13735 24th Ave South (206.973.4680):

  • Thursday, August 16: 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.
  • Friday, August 17, 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.

“The lobby has tables and chairs, computer games for children, and television,” reads the city’s announcement.

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