Study cites Highline Public Schools as national leader in technology integration


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Highline Public Schools announced Monday (June 30) that it is one of 30 districts across the nation that are subjects of a just-released study on how schools are integrating software into the classroom.

The report, entitled “Schools and Software: What’s Now and What’s Next” analyzes Highline and other school districts across the nation on the cutting edge of technology integration.

Examples of Highline’s work to integrate digital tools to support student learning include:

  • Implementing Blended Learning, which is the use of computer and online learning tools to augment in-class learning. All K-8 students use a digital math tool for 90 minutes a week, which has dramatically increased math scores.
  • Students and staff have access to district-created online courses through Canvas, an online learning management system that compliments other computer and online learning tools used with Blended Learning.
  • Staff, students, and families have increasing access to grades, assignments, and tests through illuminate IMS, an online student information system, to increase student and family involvement and communication.
  • At Mount View Elementary School, all fifth-grade students learn basic computer coding skills. Some participate each year in a virtual science fair; students explore earth systems, design science experiments, and present their learning as interactive web games, videos, or in PowerPoint.
  • Raisbeck Aviation High School has a strong 1:1 laptop program. Students get round-the-clock access to collaborative learning and a full suite of software and learning tools. While at school, students use their laptops in class to enhance and individualize the learning experience.
  • Next year, Cascade Middle School and Midway Elementary School will launch 1:1 programs. This will provide students with 24/7 access to interactive learning and individualize the learning through technology-based platforms.

The study was supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and was featured in a blogpost on Edsurge.com.

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