‘Normal is overrated’; Burien’s Cassidy Huff to perform at Benaroya Hall Nov. 10


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A great story about inspirational local icon Cassidy Huff – B-Town Blog columnist and Burien ‘Citizen of the Year’ who has gone through 41 surgeries – was posted on the Seattle Children’s blog, and it’s worth a read:

More than a year ago, 15-year-old Cassidy Huff was celebrating her birthday at Seattle Children’s on the eve of her 39th surgery. She was doing what makes her happiest – singing and playing her ukulele. She performed in front of a small crowd made up of her friends, family and medical team. One of the songs she sang was called “Halo,” a parody of Adele’s popular song “Hello,” and an ode to the metal device around her head that would soon be removed.

“When I’m playing I don’t think,” said Cassidy. “Everything around me disappears, and it’s just me. Music has always been my outlet. It tells a story and gives people an inside look into who I am.”

For Cassidy, it’s okay to not be normal. In her words, “Normal is overrated.” To other people facing adversity and obstacles, she wants them to know she understands. Her message is simple: Believe in yourself. It’s a message she takes to heart. One day, she believes she’ll be performing on Broadway. This concert is one step closer to that dream.

Today, Cassidy is preparing for another performance, this time for a much larger crowd. She’s working with Grammy-winning composer Mateo Messina on an original song for Messina’s 20th annual Seattle Children’s benefit concert called Epoch. She’ll be performing the song alongside the Northwest Symphony Orchestra in front of nearly 2,500 people at Benaroya Hall.

Mateo Messina’s 20th annual benefit concert, presented by the LUMA Guild, weaves common themes from our lives, inspired by the unique era we are living in, and written to embrace and celebrate our interconnectedness. To purchase tickets to Epoch on Nov. 10 at 8 p.m. visit LUMA Guild’s event page.

Ticket purchases will directly benefit Seattle Children’s and pediatric cancer research.

Read the full story here.

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