UPDATE: Local Filmmaker gives Port of Seattle Commissioners an ‘Intermission’


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Local attorney, activist and filmmaker Steve Edmiston took a break from his ongoing project – to brief the Port of Seattle Commissioners on the impact of aircraft operations on our communities – to talk to the Port Commissioners this week about film theory.

In two minutes on Tuesday, June 12,, Edmiston referenced Aristotle’s teachings on story, great film quests from Star Wars to Saving Private Ryan, heroes from To Kill a Mockingbird and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, and villains from a James Bond movie.

His purpose? To make sure the Commissioners recall that he’s making a film, that “in our film, the heroes are the citizens that speak for two minutes, seeking only to protect the environment and the health of their families,” and that “we don’t know what role the five of you play. Hero? Sidekick? Villain? You’ll get to decide.”

Watch Edmiston’s “Intermission” below:

The Briefing Project is a documentary blending investigative journalism, citizen activism, editorial commentary, and a bit of reality-show “it’s happening right now” intensity.

Permitted only two-minute public comments, a citizen seeks to provide a ten-month briefing to five elected officials making a choice between untethered economic growth and harm to humans and the environment. At the fastest growing airport in the U.S.

View more episodes here: https://www.quadrant45.com/#/thebriefingproject/

Learn more here:

About Steve Edmiston
Steve is a Seattle business, intellectual property, and entertainment lawyer, screenwriter, and independent film producer. He has written and produced many feature-length and short films which have won festival awards and accolades (including “Crimes of the Past,” “A Relative Thing,” “The Day My Parents Became Cool,” and most recently “The Maury Island Incident”). He serves on the Port Townsend Film Festival Board of Directors, has juried for the Washington Film Works Innovation Lab, has taught screenwriting and producing at Seattle University, University of Washington, and the Seattle Film Institute, and is a frequent speaker on the subject of the business of independent film.

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