By Nicholas Johnson

How do financial contributions to the campaigns of eight candidates running for Burien City Council compare? Below, we take a quick, race-by-race look at some of the highlights, all based on public campaign filings with the state’s Public Disclosure Commission (PDC) as of Thursday (Oct. 21, 2021).

If you want to dive deeper into the data, visit the PDC’s website for a detailed look at not only the contributions to each campaign but also each campaign’s expenditures, loans, pledges and debts. You can even explore a timeline and a map of each candidate’s campaign contributions.

Position No. 1

How do campaign contributions compare for Burien’s 8 city council candidates? 1

Candidate Hugo Garcia has raised $55,231.30, topping candidate Martin Barrett’s $37,642.71. However, Barrett’s average campaign contribution of $422.95 tops Garcia’s average contribution of $116.77.

Some 97 percent of Barrett’s campaign contributions come from individuals, compared with 78 percent of Garcia’s. Another 2.36 percent of Barrett’s contributions come from businesses, while Garcia’s contributions include 13.7 percent from political action committees, 4.6 percent from unions and 3 percent from a political party.

And while 42.7 percent of Barrett’s contributions come from outside of Burien, 73.57 percent of Garcia’s come from outside of the city.

Barrett’s five largest unique campaign contributions include $2,000 from Gig Harbor resident Thomas Jonez as well as donations from Burien resident Greg Esau, New Castle resident Lucas Mack, Seattle resident Dean Anderson and Des Moines resident Esther Monroe.

Garcia’s five largest unique campaign contributions include $2,000 each from UFCW 21’s political action committee, the Washington Education Association’s political action committee and the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades political action together legislative education committee, as well as donations from the 34th Legislative District Democrats and Seattle resident Laura Silverton.

Position No. 3

How do campaign contributions compare for Burien’s 8 city council candidates? 2

Mayor Jimmy Matta has raised $81,608.14, far surpassing candidate Mark Dorsey’s $5,381.62. Also, Matta’s average campaign contribution of $290.42 tops Dorsey’s average contribution of $131.26.

Some 81 percent of Dorsey’s campaign contributions come from individuals, compared with 71.4 percent of Matta’s.

Another 13 percent of Dorsey’s contributions come from businesses and 5.14 percent comes from himself, while 21.2 percent of Matta’s contributions come from businesses and 6.74 percent comes from unions.

And while 14.63 percent of Dorsey’s contributions come from outside of Burien, 73.67 percent of Matta’s come from outside of the city.

Matta’s five largest unique campaign contributions include $2,000 each from Burien’s El Pique Restaurant, Burien resident Shelli Park, Tacoma resident Jouse Bardales, Seattle resident Mariaelena A. Inigues and Federal Way resident William Miller.

Dorsey’s five largest unique campaign contributions include $1,000 from Seattle resident David Hohimer as well as donations from himself, Burien resident Robyn Desimone, Des Moines resident Gary Ohrt and Carnation resident Todd McKittrick.

Position No. 5

How do campaign contributions compare for Burien’s 8 city council candidates? 3

Candidate Sarah Moore has raised $23,312.51, topping candidate Alex Simkus’ $16,618.30. However, Simkus’ average campaign contribution of $251.79 tops Moore’s average contribution of $115.41.

Some 67.8 percent of Moore’s campaign contributions come from individuals, virtually the same as Simkus’ 67.7 percent.

Another 16 percent of Moore’s contributions come from unions, while 7.18 percent comes from a political party, 4.87 percent comes from political action committees, 2.28 percent comes from other sources and 1.78 percent comes from herself.

As for Simkus, 16.4 percent of his contributions come from himself, while 12 percent comes from businesses and 7 percent comes from other sources.

And while 50.55 percent of Moore’s contributions come from outside of Burien, 15.15 percent of Simkus’ comes from outside of the city.

Moore’s five largest unique campaign contributions include $2,000 from her husband, David Feinberg, as well as donations from the 34th Legislative District Democrats, SEIU Healthcare, UFCW 21’s political action committee and Brooklyn, New York, resident David Jenkins.

Simkus’ five largest unique campaign contributions include a $2,600 donation from himself as well as donations from the Washington Multi-Family Housing Association, The Point owner Bruno Inc., and Burien residents Liz and HC Mounsey.

Position No. 7

How do campaign contributions compare for Burien’s 8 city council candidates? 4

Candidate Stephanie Mora has raised $31,234.72, topping Deputy Mayor Krystal Marx’s $24,334.88. Also, Mora’s average campaign contribution of $300.33 tops Marx’s average contribution of $93.24.

Some 84 percent of Mora’s campaign contributions come from individuals, compared with 59.7 percent of Marx’s.

Another 11.9 percent of Mora’s contributions come from businesses, while 3.2 percent comes from political action committees and 0.9 percent comes from other sources.

Some 25 percent of Marx’s contributions come from political action committees, while 5.5 percent comes from a political party, 5 percent comes from herself and 4.8 percent comes from other sources.

And while 13.46 percent of Mora’s campaign contributions come from outside of Burien, 60.54 percent of Marx’s come from outside of the city.

Mora’s five largest unique campaign contributions include $2,000 each from Burien residents Liz and HC Mounsey and Burien resident David Brown, as well as donations from Your Way Technologies in Issaquah and the Washington Multi-Family Housing Association’s political action committee.

Marx’s five largest unique campaign contributions include $2,000 from UFCW 21’s political action committee as well as donations from the 34th Legislative District Democrats, SEIU Healthcare 1199 NW’s political action committee, Seattle resident Annabelle Backman and the One America Votes Justice Fund.

Nicholas Johnson (he/him) is an award-winning writer, editor and photographer who grew up in Boulevard Park, graduated from Highline High School and studied journalism at Western Washington University. Send news tips, story ideas and positive vibes to [email protected].